Jimmy Fallon Wasn’t Just Apolitical on the Golden Globes. He was Woefully Unfunny.

Much of the criticism of Jimmy Fallon’s lackluster hosting performance at the Golden Globe Awards last night has centered around his apparent refusal or inability to lampoon or comment on the political climate in a meaningful, substantive, even moderately original way. “Ernst & Young & Putin” is not exactly cutting political commentary, and saying that the Golden Globes is one of the few things in America that honors the popular vote doesn’t make much sense, given that the Globes are notoriously a sham voted on by 93 foreign journalists easily swayed by celebrities and favors from studio executives. (Skip to 2:32 in the video below for the live monologue.)

Fallon also notably opted not to address what many liberals consider the elephant in the room: his “interview” with Donald Trump just a couple months before the election, which the host ended by tussling the now-president-elect’s hair and giggling maniacally. Aside from a subtle dig during an unpleasant appearance on SNL‘s Weekend Update and a drunken interview with TMZ, Fallon hasn’t addressed the criticisms of his performance during that interview, nor has he made any attempt at self-deprecation, or even self-awareness. Nothing changed last night.

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Golden Globes 2016: My Slapdash Predictions

Each year, a collection of fewer than 100 international journalists known as the Hollywood Foreign Press Association choose their favorites in film and television from the past year. The awards are delivered at a raucous, booze-infused ceremony televised on NBC in January. This year, they’re coming just four days before the Oscar nominations.

Precedent suggests the HFPA doesn’t put a ton of rigorous thought or intellectual judgment into its decisions for the winners, so I’ve followed suit and cobbled together a list of predictions based entirely on instinct. Any time I wavered or waffled, I forced myself to pick a nominee and move on. Take this list as seriously as you do the average Golden Globe choice — which is to say, not much at all. Check back tonight to see how well I did.

MOVIES

Best Motion Picture, DramaSpotlight

Best Actress in a Drama: Brie Larson, Room

Best Actor in a Drama: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant

Best Motion Picture, ComedyThe Big Short

Best Actress in a Comedy: Jennifer Lawrence, Joy

Best Actor in a Comedy: Matt Damon, The Martian

Best Animated Motion PictureInside Out

Best Foreign Language Motion PictureSon of Saul

Best Supporting Actress: Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight

Best Supporting Actor: Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Best Director: Alejandro G. Inarritu, The Revenant

Best Screenplay: Charles Randolph and Adam McKay, The Big Short

Best Original Score: Alexandre Desplat, The Danish Girl

Best Original Song: “See You Again,” Wiz Khalifa feat. Charlie Puth, Furious 7

TELEVISION

Best Drama SeriesEmpire

Best Actress, Drama: Taraji P. Henson, Empire

Best Actor, Drama: Wagner Moura, Narcos

Best Comedy SeriesCasual

Best Actress, Comedy: Jamie Lee Curtis, Scream Queens

Best Actor, Comedy: Rob Lowe, The Grinder

Best Limited SeriesFargo

Best Actress in a Limited Series: Lady Gaga, American Horror Story: Hotel

Best Actor in a Limited Series: Oscar Isaac, Show Me a Hero

Best Supporting Actress: Judith Light, Transparent

Best Supporting Actor: Christian Slater, Mr. Robot

“House of Cards”: It’s Okay Not to Care

House of Cards

(Photo courtesy of manybits)

I’m missing out on a moment today.

When House of Card debuted to considerable fanfare last February, I did not have access to a Netflix account or the money necessary to acquire such access. I observed from the sidelines as the binge-watchers tore through each episode, finishing the series within one weekend. I observed as the show faded from the pop culture conversation as people moved on to other things (binge-watching Arrested Development). I observed as binge-watch skeptics (I would count myself among them, to an extent) finished the series at their own leisurely pace. I observed as the show became the first streaming-only, television-scale scripted series to merit serious consideration at the Emmys and the Golden Globes.

And then I was granted access to a Netflix account. But I didn’t start with House of Cards. I started with Orange is the New Black, by far the most warmly reviewed series of Netflix’s modern foray into “television.” Then I worked my way through the dense fourth season of Arrested Development, marveling at the massively complex puzzle structure while sometimes wondering why it had been seventeen minutes since I’d laughed.

And finally, I got to House of Cards.

I watched four episodes. I might have watched more, but the end of winter break and the beginning of my spring semester loomed. Tough decisions had to be made. And I decided I’d seen enough of House of Cards to know that I wasn’t clamoring to finish it.

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Alright, Alright, Alriiiiiight…Thoughts on the 2014 Golden Globe Awards

Slave

Technical glitches and Jacqueline Bisset-bombs aside, last night’s Golden Globe Awards telecast was a standard affair: drunken speechess, witty one-liners and confusing winners. Here’s a look at what five takeaways from last night’s show. (Read the full list of winners here.)

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Golden Globes 2014: Who Will Win…and Who Should

Amy Tin

Just for fun, here are my predictions for tomorrow night’s Golden Globe awards, presented without comment. Let’s see how many I get right, based almost entirely on speculation. Bonus: my preferences in every category except the ones in which I’ve seen none of the nominees.

Best Picture, Drama: 12 Years a Slave
My pick: 12 Years a Slave

Best Actress, Drama: Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
My pick: Cate Blanchett

Best Actor, Drama: Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyers Club
My pick: Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave

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2013 in Review: The Moments That Made Lame Awards Shows Worth Watching

Tina Fey and Amy Poehler

What’s the point of sitting through countless awards show every year if not to celebrate the few moments on those shows that actually justify our investment? As much as I like to complain that most awards shows are poorly structured, improperly paced and ineptly directed, I watch too many of them to argue that they shouldn’t exist at all. I watch them because I’m hoping to see something that will make the time go by more quickly, be it a spontaneous reaction or an exceptional performance. In chronological order, here are five moments from this year’s awards shows that had that effect.

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