The M&M Report: “Eighth Grade”

Image result for eighth grade movie

Devin and I briefly review Bo Burnham’s Eighth Grade, one of our favorite films of last year. Then I’m joined by Nina, a current ninth-grader with a different take on the movie’s depiction of her age group.

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The M&M Report: “Unsane”

UnsaneDevin and I review Steven Soderbergh’s latest post-retirement film Unsane, which is not the work of a man who has committed to retirement in any literal sense.

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The M&M Report: “Steve Jobs”

Jobs

On this episode of The M&M Report, Devin Mitchell and I discuss the notorious box-office bomb Steve Jobs, a big-budget prestige drama from a major studio that’s performing almost exactly the same as the 2013 indie drama Jobs (starring Ashton Freaking Kutcher).

Peruse the M&M Report category page for previous episodes of the podcast. Thanks for listening!

“Steve Jobs”: Shiny Exterior, Some Bugs

Jobs

Steve Jobs was innovative, creative, driven, dogged and inestimably intelligent. But was he an interesting person?

Judging by Steve Jobs, a feature film meticulously scripted by Aaron Sorkin and studiously crafted by Danny Boyle, the answer is…maybe not? Kind of? It’s hard to tell what the filmmakers think, let alone what you’re supposed to after spending two hours with him. As enlivened with dazzling intensity by Michael Fassbender, the Jobs of this film vociferously berates his coworkers, belittles his female colleague and confidant Joanna Hoffman (Kate Winslet) and rejects all notions of responsible parenting. Yet by the end, he is redeemed, or at least validated.

The movie doesn’t provide insight into how he gets there, nor does it transcend the limitations of its genre. The first two acts set up a fascinating story of a man overcoming professional setbacks without even the barest hint of interpersonal skills, but the third act doesn’t nail the dismount. What’s left is a cheap and lazily rendered stab at sentimentality that’s supposed to make you feel bad for a guy who spent the previous two-thirds of the movie alienating everyone around him – and you. Instead, you just feel bad for the people who will accept this cop-out as honest.

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