Who You Gonna Call? Thor Will Transfer You

Thor

News broke (okay, a tweet was sent) last night about Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters reboot: the receptionist role originated by Annie Potts will be played by Thor himself, Chris Hemsworth.

Given that Feig is clearly a big fan of SNL, I’d like to think that this sketch drove to him to give Hemsworth a call.

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The M&M Report, Episode 23: Ty Meems

Pharrell and Lupita

Listen to Episode 23 of The M&M Report here.

(Note: “Ty Meems” is “The M&M Report” Travoltified.)

This week on The M&M Report, Devin Mitchell and I sat down as soon as the Oscars to unwind with thoughts on Ellen DeGeneres, Lupita Nyong’o, Steve McQueen, Matthew McConaughey, Cate Blanchett, pizza, selfies and much more.

Thanks for listening!

Golden Globes 2014: Who Will Win…and Who Should

Amy Tin

Just for fun, here are my predictions for tomorrow night’s Golden Globe awards, presented without comment. Let’s see how many I get right, based almost entirely on speculation. Bonus: my preferences in every category except the ones in which I’ve seen none of the nominees.

Best Picture, Drama: 12 Years a Slave
My pick: 12 Years a Slave

Best Actress, Drama: Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
My pick: Cate Blanchett

Best Actor, Drama: Matthew McConaughey, Dallas Buyers Club
My pick: Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave

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“Gravity”: Untethered, Unbound, Unbelievable

Gravity

Some movies demand to be seen. Gravity demands to be experienced, in 3D, on the widest possible screen, surrounded by the most excitable people you can find. During its slim 88-minute running time, Gravity conjures the physical and emotional weight of space flight and zero-gravity navigation with more skill, grace and beauty than any movie I’ve ever seen. It’s also one of the few movies in which George Clooney’s star magnetism gets outshined, not only by his co-star, the luminous Sandra Bullock, but by the sheer force of the spectacle surrounding the two leads. Gravity takes stunning advantage of the scope that the big screen affords and the small screen lacks – anyone who says that television is better at everything than movies need only be reminded that no one does outsized spectacle like Hollywood.

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